Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Surgery

1. Will Dr. Glassman be the doctor performing my pet’s surgery?
Yes, in most cases. If a specialist is needed that will be determined way in advance of the procedure.
2. Will my pet have to stay overnight?
This all depends on the procedure being performed, the health of the patient and the time the procedure is done. If your pet needs to stay the night, we have a technician come in to stay with them. If your pet is not doing well after the procedure, we may recommend you transport them to a specialty hospital for overnight intensive care. Most of the time this scenario is discussed before the procedure is done.
3. If my cat is in the hospital, will it be around barking dogs?
We do our best to keep the cats away from loud noises. We understand they are already scared being away from home and that lessening noise will help relax.
4. Why does my pet have to be dropped off in the morning if their procedure isn’t going to be done until later?
It is much like the model in human medicine. Often we are given very early admittance times when our procedures aren’t done for hours. This gives us time to perform pre-anesthetic blood work, do any Xrays we may need, place intravenous catheters, and give fluids and medication preoperatively.

Emergency Care

5. How can I tell if my pet needs emergency veterinary care?

Fortunately, our veterinarians provide emergency care for all of our patients that are exhibiting life-threatening physical symptoms.

Emergency care is usually necessary if the following situations arise:

  • Car accidents and auto injuries
  • Dog fights or cat fights
  • Allergic reactions to toxic chemicals or food
  • Post-surgical complications,
  • Breathing difficulties.
  • Signs of heatstroke.

Your pet may need emergency veterinary care if he/she exhibits any of these symptoms:

  • Rapid breathing
  • Loss of color in the gums
  • Changes in pulse rate — either a weakening of the pulse or a rapid pulse
  • Excessive bleeding
  • Trouble standing
  • Seizures
  • Paralysis
  • Loss of consciousness.

 

Be aware of any sudden changes in your pet’s behavior, in addition to red flags signaling an emergency.

 

If your pet is bleeding profusely from an external injury, you can try to staunch the flow of blood by elevating the wound and applying pressure. This can help keep your pet alive until you can get to an emergency animal hospital in Brewster or nearby.

 

If your pet is choking, you may be able to remove the blockage from your pet’s throat with your fingers. Put your fingers in his mouth to see if you can remove the obstruction. If not, you can perform the Heimlich maneuver on your pet by rapping him sharply on the chest. You should nevertheless seek emergency care right away.

 

Call our emergency number before coming in so we can be ready for you, or direct you to the nearest emergency animal hospital in Brewster in the event that our emergency veterinarian is not available.

6. How can I prepare my pet for a trip to the Emergency Veterinarian?

Pets that are frightened and in pain after sustaining an injury can become aggressive. Approach your pet slowly and reassure him by gently speaking his name. Move your pet carefully if there’s a chance he’s suffered a spinal injury, taking care to support his back and neck.

Call our emergency number before coming in so we can be ready for you, or direct you to the nearest emergency animal hospital in Brewster in the event that our emergency veterinarian is not available.

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